29 October

Just one today – but an interesting one as the research involved quite a bit of thinking it all through and looking for connections (and also the spending of credits on ScotlandsPeople).

29 October 1813
Baptism of Mary Ann Morgan at Longside, daughter of Peter Morgan and Isobel Sangster. Her mother was the sister of my gggg grandmother Janet Sangster. Mary Ann gave birth to two illegitimate children: Barbara Sangster in 1832 (father George Sangster) and Joseph Mess Greig in 1837 (father James Greig). On both baptism entries Mary Ann Morgan is said to be of Kinmundy, which is where some of the Sangster and Morgan families lived. There is then an entry for the reading of banns for Mary Ann Morgan and David Young at Slains in November 1840: their marriage entry is quite unusual as it seems to read as if they had the banns read at Slains but were married elsewhere, though there is no other marriage entry in the OPRs. And to further complicate things, their eldest child had been baptised at Longside in October 1840. David Young was a riddle and beehive maker, and his mother was Margaret Sangster, so perhaps Mary Ann was related to him (and she may also have been related to the George Sangster who father her daughter Barbara). David Young and wife Mary are in Longside in 1841 with a baby son. In 1841 Mary Ann’s daughter Barbara is with her great aunt Barbara Sangster ar Brunthill, Cruden, which is where Mary Ann’s mother Isobel Sangster was born, but there is no trace of Joseph Greig, who may have died in infancy. In 1851 David and Mary Ann Young are in Old Machar with 4 children, and are in Old Deer in 1861 with their 4 youngest children, the eldest having died or working away from home. David Young died in 1863 at Stuartfield, Old Deer, and in 1871 Mary Young, annuitant, is at Main Street, Old Deer with her youngest daughter and a granddaughter. She is in Longside in 1881 with her son Duncan, a baker, and a different granddaughter. Mary Ann Young died in 1887 at Peterhead, widow of David Young beehive maker. Her son Duncan was a baker in Peterhead so she may have been living with him, but the informant was her son David Young. He gave her father as George Morgan and mother unknown, but Mary Ann’s parents died before 1841 so he would not have known them, and given all the other evidence I think it’s highly likely he made a mistake with Mary Ann’s father’s name.

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